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1. Impeached South Korea president to face possible arrest over major scandal

  • Duration: 52
  • Channel: news
Impeached South Korea president to face possible arrest over major scandal

Former South Korean president Park Geun-hye was recently suspended and dismissed from her top post following an extortion scandal. Prosecutors say she and a confidante worked together to extort $69 million from 16 businesses, including Samsung. The confidante, Choi Soon-sil, used the money for personal profit and did not designate the funds to non-profits like she initially promised. Park's supporters and opponents have been staging rallies and engaging in clashes with police. If Park is arrested she can then be formally charged with extortion, abusing her power and bribery, which carries up to a life sentence.


2. Impeached South Korea president to face possible arrest over major scandal

  • Duration: 52
  • Channel: news
Impeached South Korea president to face possible arrest over major scandal

Former South Korean president Park Geun-hye was recently suspended and dismissed from her top post following an extortion scandal. Prosecutors say she and a confidante worked together to extort $69 million from 16 businesses, including Samsung. The confidante, Choi Soon-sil, used the money for personal profit and did not designate the funds to non-profits like she initially promised. Park's supporters and opponents have been staging rallies and engaging in clashes with police. If Park is arrested she can then be formally charged with extortion, abusing her power and bribery, which carries up to a life sentence.


3. South Korean president's friend faces questioning over influence-peddling scandal

  • Duration: 55
  • Channel: news
South Korean president's friend faces questioning over influence-peddling scandal

South Korea’s president is under pressure to resign, and the woman at the centre of the political storm faced a swarm of angry protesters demanding her arrest. Choi Soon-sil said ‘Please forgive me’ as she entered the prosecutors office on Monday (31.10.16). She returned to Seoul on Sunday from Germany to answer questions on allegations she used her friendship with President Park Geun-hye to influence state affairs for her own benefit. The scandal erupted last month after it emerged that the country’s first female president Park had shared documents with Choi who offered her advice on speeches before presidential elections in 2012. In a public apology last Wednesday, Park admitted she shared documents, saying she had consulted Choi with draft copies of her speeches during the first months of her presidency. Choi said she received the draft speeches but denied she had access to other state documents and said she did not influence state affairs nor reap any benefits. The investigation centres on Choi using relationship with Park to solicit 63m euros from corporations to give to two non-profit organisations she set up. The prosecutor’s office has promised a thorough investigation, but the political damage is already evident. The fallout Four years into her five-year term, support for Park is at an all-time low. One poll showed 40% wanted her to step down or be impeached. On Sunday thousands of Koreans rallied for Park’s resignation saying she had betrayed the public’s trust. It came as prosecutors investigated presidential aides to determine whether broke the law by allowing Choi undue influence or financial gain. Over the weekend several presidential aides, including the chief-of-staff stepped down. Opposition parties demanded a thorough investigation, but so far there have been no calls to impeach her. The Friendship Park said Choi was someone  “who gave me help when I was going through a difficult time,” in her televised apology last week. Yet, she holds no official position and has no security clearance. Their ties date back to the 1970s, but grew closer when Choi’s father, the leader of a religious cult, died in 1994. Park was elected to the national assembly in 1998. In the run-up to the 2012 election, Choi’s ex-husband worked closely with Park on her successful presidential bid.


4. Samsung Unit to Invest $2.5B More In Vietnam

  • Duration: 161
  • Channel: news
Samsung Unit to Invest $2.5B More In Vietnam

Samsung Unit to Invest $2.5B More In Vietnam Earlier Friday, a report surfaced that two senior executives have said they will resign and take responsibility for the company’s involvement in a bribery case that resulted in the impeachment of South Korean President Park Geun-hye and the arrest of Jay Y. Lee, vice chairman of Samsung Electronics. According to a report in Reuters, citing Vietnam’s VTV state television, the license to invest $2.5 billion more in the county will enable Samsung to increase the production of its display panels to 220 million units a year up from the current 180 million a year. Also, the numerous financial incentives the Vietnamese government provides to tech companies, including corporate income tax reductions and tax holidays, make the country even more appealing to foreign investors. While Vietnam has been known in the past for being a manufacturer of clothing, it has been rapidly expanding into the tech sector over the past few years and is now a major manufacturing hub for Samsung Electronics and its many subsidiaries. Samsung Electronics’ (SSNLF) display panel unit has reportedly gotten approval to invest an additional $2.5 billion in Vietnam to increase the amount of capacity for its flat panel displays. As geopolitical tensions and wages continue to rise in many parts of the world, particularly in other parts of Asia, many high-tech companies have turned their attention to Vietnam. The fact that the Vietnamese government appears to be supporting the development of local tech companies through new policies serves to further the country’s appeal to tech outfits.


5. South Korean president impeached; two dead in riots

  • Duration: 68
  • Channel: news
South Korean president impeached; two dead in riots

South Korean President Park Guen-hye was ruled by the country’s Constitution Court to be removed from office. In December, Park was impeached on charges of soliciting bribes from large businesses and scheming with longtime confidante Choi Soon-sil. Prime Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn will serve as the acting president while a new presidential election is held. Riots broke out after the court decided to uphold the impeachment of President Park. Over 100 Park supporters swarmed to the Constitution Court to protest and approximately 21,000 police officers were sent out on standby. Two people died in the riots while 30 protestors and police officers were injured. Park is the first democratically elected president to be removed from office in South Korea and can now face criminal prosecution.


6. South Korea begins to recover sunken Sewol Ferry that killed 300

  • Duration: 48
  • Channel: news
South Korea begins to recover sunken Sewol Ferry that killed 300

Three years after the tragic Sewol ferry incident, the South Korean government ordered a recovery team to retrieve the ferry from the sea. The planned recovery was initiated after the impeachment of former President Park Geun-hye, who faced criticism for how she handled the disaster. Engineers will attempt to lift the 140-meter long ferry from the sea by using lifting beams and pontoons. They will try to preserve the boat as much as possible, hoping to find the bodies of nine victims who are believed to be still inside. The Sewol ferry sank on April 16, 2014 off the southwest Korean Coast, killing nearly 300 passengers on board. Ferry Captain Lee Joon-seok was convicted of murder for the incident.


7. Pro- and anti- Park rallies staged in Seoul

  • Duration: 95
  • Channel: news
Pro- and anti- Park rallies staged in Seoul

Supporters of South Korean President Park Guen-hye have rallied to call for her reinstatement. Opponents have gathered to repeat their demands that the leader, impeached over a corruption scandal, should step down immediately. Supporters rally The Park supporters, who last held a major rally in mid-November, began their demonstration first. They have been in the minority during the weeks of protests demanding her removal. There have been huge rallies over seven straight weekends, packing the streets of Seoul. Saturday’s pro-Park rally near the court and a few blocks from the presidential Blue House, drew largely older people who said those behind the movement to oust her are misguided. Ridiculous. This protest against the impeachment is going on for miles. #seoul #southkorea pic.twitter.com/o1CAk6Ydpt— Nicky Kim (@nckykm) December 17, 2016 Anti-Park rally Many of her opponents are angry that Park’s lawyers argued on Friday that the impeachment has no legal basis. What the lawyers say Park’s lawyers struck a defiant note in their first comments since the impeachment vote. They said the motion should be overturned by the Constitutional Court, which has 180 days to review it. The lawyers’ submission to the court rejected all the points made in the impeachment motion approved by a wide margin by parliament on December the 9th. It accused her of violating her constitutional duty and breaking the law. The background Park’s presidential powers have been suspended since the vote for impeachment on December the 9th. The Constitutional Court must decide whether or not to uphold the motion. The 64-year-old is accused of colluding with long-time friend Choi Soon-sil to pressure big businesses to make contributions to non-profit foundations backing presidential initiatives. Soon has been indicted and is in custody. Park has indicated she will not step down. She has denied wrongdoing but has apologised for “carelessness” in her ties with Choi. If the impeachment is upheld, or Park steps down voluntarily, a new election has to be held within 60 days to pick a new leader who will serve a single, five-year term. Park’s term was originally due to end in February 2018. Crucial week for South Korea’s Park Guen-hye with impeachment push https://t.co/nPwF1vuaj3 pic.twitter.com/S0QyAOpAba— The Wire (@thewire_in) December 5, 2016 What they are saying “This is my first time out here, but yesterday when I heard about her opinion against the impeachment, submitted to the Constitutional Court, whatever pity I felt for her disappeared,” – 55-year-old protester Roh Yi-young. “The people who love this country have come out to save the country despite the hardship,” – 69-year-old protester Kim Ku-ja “We are blaming the decision of impeachment on teh media, which mislead the people with false information. The grounds for impeachment


8. "Overtaken By Events" Kids Burst Onto Scene Of Live on BBC News Interview with Robert Kelly

  • Duration: 44
  • Channel: news

An interview about South Korea's political upheaval became one of the most popular things on the Internet on Friday, when the children of professor Robert E. Kelly became the inadvertent stars of his spot on the BBC. The BBC News video of the sequence was retweeted and "liked" thousands of times, and Kelly won empathy — especially from those who said they can identify with the struggle to be both a professional and a parent in the same moment. "I think it's awesome that a man can be world class in his field and have a family where their kids feel comfortable enough to play with him," Rob Erickson said via Twitter. Kelly was offering his thoughts about the impeachment of President Park Geun-hye when his daughter infiltrated the live Skype interview — and in an instant, viewers who had been pondering the Korean peninsula were instead watching the pigtailed girl bop into the room, clearly pleased to have found her daddy. "I think one of your children has just walked in," the BBC anchor said, prompting Kelly to reach behind him to keep his daughter back from the camera. Kelly smiled, and the girl settled onto a table in what looks to be his home office in Pusan to have a snack, and all seemed settled. And that's when Kelly's toddler son got into the act, bursting into the room in a rolling walker and making a beeline toward the camera. At that point, off-camera giggles erupted from the BBC set, and while Kelly did his best to keep his composure, a woman rushed into the room to retrieve the children. "Pardon me," Kelly said. "My apologies." He proceeded to go over recent events on the Korean peninsula, even as an obviously emotional scene played out outside his door. When a BBC producer asked him via Twitter about reposting the video, Kelly responded by asking, "What would that mean, please? Rebroadcasting it on BBC TV, or just here on Twitter? Is this kinda thing that goes 'viral' and gets weird?" While the majority of responses we've seen have been positive, some viewers have questioned the way Kelly pushed his daughter — one person wrote on Twitter that he "stiff armed his kid without breaking his steely, unflinching camera gaze." And on the BBC Newsbeat's Facebook posting of the video, a top comment by Joe Gee Karanja reads, "I wouldn't be embarrassed by my kids... he could've just grabbed the child with yellow sweater and place her on his lap. Nothing wrong with that." To that, Micaela Doran replied, "Really? He's trying to remain professional. There is a time and place for family time. This was work time. Children need to learn this too." By the time he was on the BBC (watch the full interview here), Kelly had already spoken to CNN International and Australia's ABC network, as he monitored the fallout from Park's removal from office. In reply to Kelly's tweet about the video going viral, defense researcher Ziya Meral wrote, "do not worry! It is not a negative even if it goes viral. All of us who give interviews from home would smile and love it." Adding to that sentiment, Canadian relationship expert Dr. Kimberly Moffitt responded, "This is TV GOLD and in the best possible way. We can all relate my friend. I've had a similar experience!"


9. South Korea's impeached president leaves presidential compound

  • Duration: 51
  • Channel: news
South Korea's impeached president leaves presidential compound

South Korea's ousted President Park Geun-hye left the presidential Blue House, two days after the court voted to impeach her over allegations of corruption. Park now faces the possibility of prosecution and jail time following her corruption scandal. The former president took off to her private home in Seol, according to her spokesman Kim Dong-jo. Park apologized for not being able to fulfill her presidential duties until the very end. North Korea praised her impeachment, noting that Park's leadership was leading the country to a "destructive end."


10. Impeachment Trial Begins for South Korean President

  • Duration: 49
  • Channel: news
Impeachment Trial Begins for South Korean President

South Korea's Constitutional Court held the first hearing in preparation for President Park Geun-hye's impeachment. Lawmakers voted to remove the president from office after a corruption scandal recently led millions of people to protest. Park faces allegations that she colluded with a longtime confidante to extort money and favors from major companies in South Korea. Her confidante, Choi Soon-sil, is also alleged of interfering with government affairs.


11. South Korea sees largest protest in weeks of demos against president Park Geun-hye

  • Duration: 51
  • Channel: news
South Korea sees largest protest in weeks of demos against president Park Geun-hye

A flood of candles in downtown Seoul give a stunning visual to the peaceful protest and show the scale of anger in South Korea over the corruption scandal surrounding the country’s embattled leader. South Korea has seen what is estimated to be its biggest protest in five weeks of demonstrations calling for the president to step down. According to organisers up to 1.5 million people took to the streets of Seoul, while police put the number in the hundreds of thousands. “It has become apparent that Park Geun-hye, as a criminal, is neither qualified nor capable of being a president. She needs to step down immediately,” one protest organiser told a reporter. Part protest, part street party: Organizers claim 1.3 mln have flooded downtown #Seoul #SouthKorea to pressure prez #박근혜 to resign. pic.twitter.com/tvCW8IWxop— Jean H. Lee (@newsjean) November 26, 2016 Leader Park Geun-hye is accused of allowing a friend to meddle in state affairs and commit extortion. She has publicly apologised twice over the affair, but refuses to resign. She is now facing a possible impeachment. The National Assembly is to vote on a bill by December 9.


12. South Korea's president 'refuses' prosecutors' demands in corruption probe

  • Duration: 67
  • Channel: news
South Korea's president 'refuses' prosecutors' demands in corruption probe

South Korean President Park Geun-hye will not make herself available for questioning by prosecutors over a corruption scandal, according to her lawyer. He rejected claims by prosecutors who allege the president was an accomplice in helping a friend exploit her ties to amass a fortune illegally. Choi Soon-sil has now been formally charged with abuse of power in pressuring large businesses to contribute millions of dollars in funds to two non-profit foundations. Two former aides to the president have also been indicted. “The special investigations team judged on all evidence that President Park Geun-hye is suspected of colluding with the three suspects, Choi Soon-sil, An Chong-bum and Jeong Ho-seong in their criminal conduct,” said Lee Young-ryeol, head of the Seoul Central District Prosecutors’ Office. The two aides stepped down late last month as the crisis deepened. Lee also said the president would be questioned soon: this was before the intervention from her lawyer. Yoo Yeong-ha rejected the assertion that the president was involved, saying prosecutors had “built a house of fantasy”. Many South Koreans have reacted with outrage to the unfolding scandal: tens of thousands protested in Seoul in the latest rally calling on President Park to resign. Her presidency has been shaken by the accusations that Choi exploited her ties to Park to interfere in state affairs and wield improper influence, but she has resisted the demands to quit. The president had previously said she would cooperate with the investigation but now seems intent on protecting her constitutional immunity. The country’s parliament has approved a bill to appoint a special prosecutor, to replace the state investigators and conduct a separate and more wide-reaching inquiry. Opposition parties have said Park will face impeachment proceedings if she refuses to step down. The president’s five-year term ends in February 2018.


13. North Korea warns it could sink the USS Carl Vinson with a single strike

  • Duration: 350
  • Channel: news
North Korea warns it could sink the USS Carl Vinson with a single strike

North Korea warns it could sink the USS Carl Vinson with a single strike https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMJyQDjLfs8cYxfy_PxSuDg Greetings citizens of the world, North Korea said on Sunday it was ready to sink a U.S. aircraft carrier to demonstrate its military might, in the latest sign of rising tension as U.S. President Donald Trump prepared to call the leaders of China and Japan. The United States ordered the USS Carl Vinson carrier strike group to sail to waters off the Korean peninsula in response to mounting concern over the North's nuclear and missile tests, and its threats to attack the United States and its Asian allies. The U.S. government has not specified where the carrier strike group is as it approaches the area. U.S. Vice President Mike Pence said on Saturday it would arrive "within days," but gave no other details. North Korea remained defiant. "Our revolutionary forces are combat-ready to sink a U.S. nuclear-powered aircraft carrier with a single strike," the Rodong Sinmun, the newspaper of the North's ruling Workers' Party, said in a commentary. The paper likened the aircraft carrier to a "gross animal" and said a strike on it would be "an actual example to show our military's force". The commentary was carried on page three of the newspaper, after a two-page feature about leader Kim Jong Un inspecting a pig farm. A senior U.S. administration official said Trump was expected to speak later on Sunday with Chinese President Xi Jinping and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. In another sign of the intense focus on Pyongyang in Washington, the White House is expected to host U.S. senators for a top-level briefing on North Korea on Wednesday, a White House official said. The official said the briefing would be led by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and Marine General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. U.S. and South Korean officials have been saying for weeks the North could soon stage another nuclear test, something the United States, China and others have warned against. South Korea has put its forces on heightened alert. China, North Korea's sole major ally, opposes Pyongyang's weapons programs and has appealed for calm. The United States has called on China to do more to help defuse the tension. Speaking during a visit to Greece, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said there were already enough shows of force and confrontation and appealed for calm. "We need to issue peaceful and rational sounds," Wang said, according to a statement issued by China's Foreign Ministry. U.S. CITIZEN DETAINED Adding to the tensions, North Korea detained a Korean-American man in his 50s, bringing the total number of U.S. citizens held by Pyongyang to three. The man, Tony Kim, had been in North Korea for a month teaching accounting at the Pyongyang University of Science and Technology (PUST), the institution's chancellor, Chan-Mo Park, told Reuters. He was arrested at Pyongyang International Airport on his way out of the country. The arrest took place on Saturday morning local time, the university said in a statement, and was "related to an investigation into matters that are not connected in any way to PUST". North Korea will mark the 85th anniversary of the foundation of its Korean People's Army on Tuesday. It has in the past marked important anniversaries with tests of its weapons. North Korea has conducted five nuclear tests, two of them last year, and is working to develop nuclear-tipped missiles that can reach the United States. It has also carried out a series of ballistic missile tests in defiance of U.N. sanctions. North Korea's growing nuclear and missile threat is perhaps the most serious security challenge confronting Trump. He has vowed to prevent the North from being able to hit the United States with a nuclear missile and has said all options are on the table, including a military strike. WORRY IN JAPAN North Korea says its nuclear program is for self-defense and has warned the United States of a nuclear attack in response to any aggression. It has also threatened to lay waste to South Korea and Japan. The U.S. defense secretary said on Friday that North Korea's recent statements were provocative but had proven to be hollow in the past and should not be trusted. "We've all come to hear their words repeatedly; their word has not proven honest," Mattis told a news conference in Tel Aviv, before the latest threat to the aircraft carrier. Two Japanese warships, the Samidare and Ashigara, left western Japan on Friday to join the Carl Vinson and will "practice a variety of tactics" with the U.S. strike group, the Japan Maritime Self Defence Force said in a statement. The Japanese force did not specify where the exercises were taking place, but the destroyers by Sunday could have reached an area 2,500 km (1,500 miles) south of Japan, which would be east of the Philippines. From


14. U.S. ambassador to be discharged from hospital Tuesday afternoon

  • Duration: 107
  • Channel: news
U.S. ambassador to be discharged from hospital Tuesday afternoon

And immediately upon arriving in Seoul, President Park went to visit U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert... who is making a fast recovery from last week's knife attack. He is expected to be discharged from the hospital tomorrow afternoon. Here's Arirang's Hwang Sung-hee with more. Doctors say Ambassador Lippert will likely be out of the hospital by Tuesday afternoon. The U.S. envoy needed 80 stitches on his face and arm following a brutal knife attack last week in central Seoul. "We are planning to remove half of the stitches this morning and the other half tomorrow morning. If there's no problem, he will leave the hospital tomorrow afternoon." The 55-year-old assailant, Kim Ki-jong, who is now under arrest, was protesting the ongoing joint military drills between Seoul and Washington. The attack raised concerns about whether it would leave a dent in relations between the two allies. But President Park Geun-hye, visiting the ambassador on Monday, said his handling of the incident had strengthened the alliance. "People in both the United States and South Korea were deeply moved by your bold and brave manner of dealing with the incident. I believe it was an incident that brought South Korea and the U.S. even closer together." President Park headed over to the hospital upon her return from the Middle East, saying she was saddened by the news, since she, too, was a victim of a similar attack back in 2006. The doctors treating Ambassador Lippert say he is in good spirits and eager to get back to work as soon as possible. Hwang Sung-hee, Arirang News.


15. U.S. ambassador to be discharged from hospital Tuesday afternoon

  • Duration: 109
  • Channel: news
U.S. ambassador to be discharged from hospital Tuesday afternoon

And immediately upon arriving in Seoul, President Park went to visit U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert,... who's making a fast recovery from last week's knife attack. He is expected to be discharged from the hospital tomorrow afternoon. Here's Arirang's Hwang Sung-hee with more. Doctors say Ambassador Lippert will likely be out of the hospital by Tuesday afternoon. The U.S. envoy needed 80 stitches on his face and arm following a brutal knife attack last week in central Seoul. "We are planning to remove half of the stitches this morning and the other half tomorrow morning. If there's no problem, he will leave the hospital tomorrow afternoon." The 55-year-old assailant, Kim Ki-jong, who is now under arrest, was protesting the ongoing joint military drills between Seoul and Washington. The attack raised concerns about whether it would leave a dent in relations between the two allies. But President Park Geun-hye, visiting the ambassador on Monday, said his handling of the incident had strengthened the alliance. "People in both the United States and South Korea were deeply moved by your bold and brave manner of dealing with the incident. I believe it was an incident that brought South Korea and the U.S. even closer together." President Park headed over to the hospital upon her return from the Middle East, saying she was saddened by the news, since she, too, was a victim of a similar attack back in 2006. The doctors treating Ambassador Lippert say he is in good spirits and eager to get back to work as soon as possible. Hwang Sung-hee, Arirang News.


16. News in Brief -- 9th March -- 1230 GMT

  • Duration: 174
  • Channel: news
News in Brief -- 9th March -- 1230 GMT

1) Iran’s Islamic Revolution Guards Corps has fired two ballistic missiles as part of the final phase of its military drills. The missiles, named Qadr-H and Qadr-F, have a maximum range of two-thousand kilometers. They were fired from Alborz Mountains, and successfully hit mock enemy targets 1,400 kilometers away. 2) Syrian Kurdish forces have accused foreign-backed militants of shelling their positions in Aleppo province with chemical weapons. Kurdish officials say the shelling came from different areas, hitting the district of Sheikh Maqsood. They say the bombs apparently had phosphor in them. 3) Israeli forces have shot dead three Palestinians and injured one in separate incidents in the occupied West Bank. Israeli officials accused them of carrying out stabbing and car-ramming attacks. Nearly 200 Palestinians have been killed by Israelis since October when a new wave of violence erupted in occupied territories. 4) British junior doctors have launched a 48-hour strike over wages and working hours. The National Health Service has canceled over 5,000 non-urgent operations and urged people to avoid going to emergency departments whenever possible. An unknown number of consultations are also expected to be affected at outpatient clinics. 5) Yemen’s Ansarullah movement and Saudis have swapped prisoners as part of a larger border truce. Saudi media say Yemeni forces have freed a Saudi lieutenant in return for seven detained Yemenis. The initiative was discussed during a visit by Yemeni tribal mediators to the kingdom. 6) The US says it is trying to convince the Australian government to allow the deployment of B-1 bombers and aerial tankers in the Northern Territory. Commander of US Pacific Air Forces, General Lori Robinson, says the aircraft will be set within striking distance of the disputed South China Sea. 7) In Brazil, supporters of embattled President Dilma Rousseff and her predecessor Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva have rallied in Sao Paulo. The protesters have called for the withdrawal of the corruption allegations against Rousseff and Lula. Rousseff faces impeachment proceedings over alleged fiscal mismanagement. 8) Iraqi President Fuad Masum has supported Russian airstrikes in neighboring Syria. Masum says the air campaign has severely helped Iraqi forces in their battle against Daesh terrorists. He also says Baghdad supports anti-terrorist operations wherever they may be, including North Africa.


17. Vice President of EU Parliament Urges Korea to not Deport Falun Gong Practitioners

  • Duration: 79
  • Channel: news
Vice President of EU Parliament Urges Korea to not Deport Falun Gong Practitioners

For more news and videos visit ☛ http://english.ntdtv.com Follow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevision Add us on Facebook ☛ http://facebook.com/NTDTelevision We told you earlier this week that the South Korean government is planning to deport a Chinese refugee who applied for asylum. He practices Falun Gong--a spiritual practice that's being brutally persecuted in China. Now European Parliament Vice-President Edward McMillian-Scott has written to the president of South Korea--urging him and his government to stop these kinds of deportations. Back on September 6th, South Korean police had arrested the refugee, Mr. Jin, along with his wife. Mr. Jin is still being detained and faces possible deportation. McMillian-Scott wrote in his letter to president Lee Myung-Bak, that "Since 1999 practitioners of Falun Gong--a Buddha-school peaceful way of life--have been terribly persecuted, imprisoned and abused." The young couple from China had applied for asylum in South Korea, but were rejected. McMillian-Scott says this goes against the country's principles. He writes: "Despite the terrible situation of practitioners in China, of the approximately 100 who have applied for asylum in South Korea, almost all have been rejected. This appears to go against Article 3 of the proposed 2009 Bill on Refugee Status Determination and Treatment of Refugees and Others." To date, the South Korean government has deported more than ten Falun Gong practitioners back to China, where they face the possibility of arrest, torture, and even death.


18. Thousands of South Koreans rally in Seoul, calling for embattled president to go

  • Duration: 64
  • Channel: news
Thousands of South Koreans rally in Seoul, calling for embattled president to go

Tens of thousands of South Koreans have joined a candle-lit rally in Seoul, calling on the country’s embattled president to go. Park Geun-hye has been rocked by a scandal involving an old friend, who’s alleged to have used her closeness to meddle in state affairs. The president’s made a tearful apology, saying her “heart was breaking” – and has pledged to cooperate with prosecutors in their investigation. “There is even talk that I fell into a cult or I held a shamanistic ritual at the Blue House. I am saying clearly: none of this is true,” she said. (LEAD) Massive rally in Seoul to demand Park's resignation https://t.co/5×5XMwCOfy— Yonhap News Agency (@YonhapNews) 5 November 2016 The lawyer for Park’s long-time friend, Choi Soon-sil, says he expects prosecutors to probe whether she inappropriately received classified documents – and benefitted unlawfully from two non-profit organisations. Koreans are angry, claiming Park has betrayed public trust and mismanaged her government. Park has sacked many of her immediate advisers over the crisis. A former aide was arrested on Thursday on suspicion of leaking classified information, according to a prosecution official. No South Korean president has ever failed to finish their five-year term, but Park has faced growing pressure from the public and political opponents to quit.


19. [PDF] On the Global Waterfront: The Fight to Free the Charleston 5 Full Collection

  • Duration: 25
  • Channel: lifestyle
[PDF] On the Global Waterfront: The Fight to Free the Charleston 5 Full Collection

Visit Here http://exceedebooks.site/?book=1583671633 Visit the book websiteLongshoremen stand at the nexus of the global economy, handling nearly every cargo container that enters or leaves any country. Even in the face of cargo “containerization� in the 70s and 80s, a development that decimated longshore unions, they have managed to win contracts that provide health benefits and high wages.On the Global Waterfront tells the story of how longshoremen in South Carolina confronted attempts to wipe out the state’s most powerful black organization. When a Danish shipping company began to shift their transportation to a nonunion firm in 1999, Local 1422 in Charleston, South Carolina, mobilized to protect their hard-won rights. What followed culminated in a protest in which 660 riot police were deployed against fifty dockworkers, a group that grew to 150 before the night was over. Four black and one white longshoreman — subsequently known as the Charleston 5 — were held for twenty months under house arrest on trumped-up felony charges of inciting a riot.Within the politically conservative, racially charged, and intensely religious climate of the South, the unassuming local union president, Ken Riley — supported behind the scenes by a militant AFL-CIO staffer — crafted an international, grassroots campaign in defense of the arrested longshoremen. From Australia to Europe to Korea to the entire west coast of the United States, longshoremen threatened to shut down ports jeopardizing billions of dollars in trade per day. Their ultimate success vaulted Riley, and his reform-minded coworkers, to higher leadership in a notoriously corrupt union, and laid the foundation for successful rebuffs in ports around the world. On the Global Waterfront explores in detail a local conflict and in the process exposes the powers that rule the United States and the global economy. This compelling narrative of a local struggle, a transformed union leader, and a newly energized international worker movement highlights the resounding importance of the international labor movement that is not only still vital, but still capable of stopping global commerce on a dime.


20. Suspected Russian Arms Dealer Facing Extradition to U.S.

  • Duration: 81
  • Channel: news
Suspected Russian Arms Dealer Facing Extradition to U.S.

Suspected Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout arrives at Thai court for a verdict on extra charges filed against him. The court dismissed the charges and he now relies on the Thai President to halt his extradition to the United States. Suspected Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout arrived back at Bangkok's criminal court on Tuesday for a ruling on money laundering and wire fraud charges. The court dismissed the charges removing a major obstacle to his extradition to the United States. The legal wrangling is the latest twist in a two-year diplomatic tug of war between Washington and Moscow over a man accused of trafficking weapons since the 1990s to dictators and conflict zones in Africa, South America and the Middle East. Bout, a 43-year-old former Soviet air force pilot, was arrested after a sting operation in Bangkok involving undercover US agents posing as rebels from Colombia's Marxist FARC group. Bout has also petitioned Thailand's prime minister to block the extradition. The prime minister says he will make a decision based on national and diplomatic interests. Bout faces a maximum sentence of life in prison if convicted in the United States on charges including conspiracy to kill US nationals and providing material support or resources to a foreign terrorist organization.